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Edwards Summer Undergraduate Research Program

Edwards Summer Undergraduate Research Program

The Edwards Lifesciences Summer Undergraduate Research Program (E-SURP) provides funding for UCI undergraduates who are conducting summer research projects under the guidance of UCI faculty mentors who are associated with the Edwards Lifesciences Cardiovascular Innovation and Research Center. The program offers students the opportunity to become immersed in a cardiovascular-related research topic for a full-time ten-week period, or the equivalent of 400 hours.

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University of California, Irvine
Irvine, CA 92697-5670
urop@uci.edu

The Edwards Lifesciences Summer Undergraduate Research Program (E-SURP) provides funding for UCI undergraduates who are conducting summer research projects under the guidance of UCI faculty mentors who are associated with the Edwards Lifesciences Cardiovascular Innovation and Research Center. The program offers students the opportunity to become immersed in a cardiovascular-related research topic for a full-time ten-week period, or the equivalent of 400 hours.

Students can apply for funding by submitting a proposal during the E-SURP Call for Proposals in the Spring Quarter of each academic year. E-SURP is open to all non-graduating (must be a returning student) UCI undergraduates who are in good academic standing and who will have been involved in a research project for at least one quarter before the beginning of the Summer. Proposals should be prepared by the student applicant and jointly submitted by the student and a faculty member.

E-SURP Fellowships will be awarded on a competitive basis, based on recommendations by the E-SURP Selection Committee. Fellows are awarded a maximum $2,000 stipend in support of their time and efforts conducting a summer research project or creative activity. Requests can be for less than $2,000 if other funding sources are contributing to the student’s summer stipend. These funds are NOT intended to support such expenditures as the purchase of research-related materials and supplies, but students could use part of their stipends for such items. Requests for project-related supplies can be submitted in response to UROP’s Call for Proposals. Students receiving adequate funding from departmental or other sources can submit an application for an E-SURP Honorary Fellowship.

Students who receive the E-SURP Fellowship can enroll in summer courses, upon receiving approval from their faculty mentors, as long as they meet the 400-hour minimum requirement of the fellowship. E-SURP is administered by the Edwards Lifesciences Cardiovascular innovation and Research Center and the Undergraduate Research Opportunities Program (UROP).

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Graduate CARE Program

Cardiovascular Applied Research and Entrepreneurship

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The underlying premise, which forms the foundation of this training program, is a shortage of highly trained scientists with cross-training in three synergistic disciplines: 1) engineering, 2) cardiovascular science, and 3) entrepreneurship. Our primary goal is to train a relatively small number of highly qualified individuals who can produce quality and impactful research in cardiovascular science and technology. Additionally, trainees will also develop an enhanced skill set to assess the translational potential of cardiovascular research, and will thus be able to communicate more effectively with entrepreneurial professionals. This level of “fluency” in entrepreneurship is a unique feature of our training program. Through this fluency, the training program is able to accelerate the development of cardiovascular technology to treat and diagnose cardiovascular disease. We refer to our program as Cardiovascular Applied Research and Entrepreneurship (CARE).

Background

The current training paradigm for individuals able to engineer new cardiovascular technology has two typical pathways: clinical training or formal education as an engineer. Clinical training is demanding and rightly focuses on training individuals who deliver cardiovascular healthcare. Cardiovascular clinicians are normally the first to recognize a shortcoming in available technology, but generally do not have the skill or training in engineering or business.

When receiving formal training as an engineer (e.g., biomedical engineering) at bachelors through doctoral levels, an individuals’ core “language” is shaped by the vocabulary of engineering science and design principles with some limited understanding of the cardiovascular system. Often this individual is the first to recognize an exciting new technology, but lacks the business acumen or knowledge of clinical applications to understand the translational potential.

The CARE Training Program is designed to bridge the knowledge and fluency gaps not only between these two current traditional pathways, but also in the area of entrepreneurship. The expectation is that these individuals will produce quality and impactful research in cardiovascular science and technology, as well as develop an enhanced skill set to assess the translational potential of cardiovascular research, and will thus be able to communicate more effectively with entrepreneurial professionals.